Hyperresolution Neptunia 0.1 alpha release

Today I looked into the rendering resolution issue for Hyperdimension Neptunia Re;Birth 1, which was recently released on Steam.

What’s interesting about this release is that it uses OpenGL, which is really rare in Windows games these days. It’s the first Japanese port I’ve seen which uses it. Therefore I was interested in having a look, as I’d never done any interception work on an OpenGL game before.

The good news is that the free software situation is much better for OpenGL than it is for DirectX (and particularly, than it was for DIrectX before I started DSFix and later GeDoSaTo :P), with multiple options available for handling the mechanics of interception/logging etc. After some googling I chose glintercept to base this work on, and I haven’t regretted this choice at all. The codebase seems a bit heavy at a first glance, but you only really need to deal with the plugin interface, which seems solid from what I’ve tried.

As for the game itself, after acclimating myself to OpenGL it was basically the same process as always: find buffer creation calls, intercept, try, find stuff that breaks, and iterate until done. In this particular case HUD and minmap rendering were the easiest to fix of any game I’ve worked on so far, and it took less than an hour for those after I got basic rendering at higher resolutions working.

Anyway, here is the download.

And if you want to contribute to my continuing struggle for more pixels, you can do so here (this link includes a reference that lets me know you are donating because of Neptunia in particular).



Aliasing and Anti-aliasing Comparison Tool

ss_2013-12-24_20-32-42This is a tool for illustrating the various types of aliasing which can occur in computer graphics, and how many common methods of anti-aliasing interact with them. I wrote it to accompany an article which will be published some time in the future, and which contains a rather detailed treatment of the topics of aliasing and anti-aliasing.

A main point is to also show aliasing (that is, flickering and image instability) in motion, which is insufficiently captured by the common screenshot or (compressed) video comparisons.

There are 6 types of aliasing shown (transparency aliasing, geometry aliasing (2D and 3D), sub-pixel aliasing, texture aliasing and shader aliasing), and many methods of anti-aliasing are available.

ss_2013-12-24_20-44-07The 1-8 keys are mapped to presets which show some common anti-aliasing methods:

  1.  none
  2. 4x MSAA
    multisampling, generally sparse grid
  3. 2×2 OGSSAA
    ordered grid supersampling with 4 samples
  4. 4x SSAA
    turns the 4 multisamples into supersamples, thus 4x SGSSAA on most HW
  5. FXAA
    just post-processing, see sub-pixel effects
  6. SMAA
    as above (note better motion stability)
  7. 1.5×1.5 OGSSAA + SMAA
    similar to what can be achieved via injection in most games, often decently playable
  8. best
    maximum number of SGSSAA samples plus 2×2 OGSSAA. Close to the “ground truth”, that is the perfect representation of the scene on the pixel grid

Let me know if anything breaks. I do know that the PXAA and TPXAA PPAA methods don’t work on AMD, if anyone wants to help fix it (and has the time) contact me and provide some means of synchronous communication (e.g. Steam ID).

Source code release soon.

Download here!

(If you encounter an error about missing some .dll when running the program, get the Microsoft C++ redistributable here)

(Edit 2014-1-14: updated to fix an issue which could occur with some AMD drivers)

PtBi 4.1516

I just fixed the crash bug in PtBi introduced with the latest NVidia WHQL drivers.

If anyone from NV is reading this, I really don’t think having a:

Should cause the shader compiler to spit out this:

It works just fine without the “restrict”.

Anyway, if you’re using PtBi with a NV GPU then you can find an updated, working version on the PtBi homepage. Sorry for the delay in fixing this.

Easy font rendering in OpenGL

It’s surprising to what degree you are expected to bloat your code base, executable size and/or dependencies when you just want some decent true type font rendering in a cross-platform OpenGL application. Thankfully, Sean Barrett wrote the wonderful stb_truetype.h (and released it to the public domain no less!), which solves the problem in a single (under 2000 line) header file you can just drop into your project.

If you don’t want Visual Studio 11′s debugger to throw you out due to uninitialized values, replace line 1038 in that file with

It should have previously been

By the way, his site also hosts a great and similarly easy to use image reading/writing library.